H.L. Mencken House

Description

"As much a part of me as my own two hands," is how Henry Louis Mencken described his house at 1524 Hollins Street and his personality can be seen in everything from the parquet floors to the garden tiles. In 1880, Mencken was brought by his parents as an infant to the house and lived there until his death at the age of 75.

Much of Mencken's writing, reading and thinking was done in the second floor front study, with its view of Union Square and the surrounding neighborhood. It was here where Mencken's "councils of war" were held over various government actions to suppress books and where Mencken convinced the famous lawyer Clarence Darrow to defend John Scopes in the Scopes Monkey Trial. It was also in this room where Mencken wrote the newspaper columns and books that made him, in the words of journalist Walter Lippmann, "the most powerful personal influence" in America. The house was a central feature of the former City Life Museums, and since its closing in 1997, the Friends of the H.L. Mencken House have cared for the building.

Audio Show

Introduction to the H.L. Mencken House

Excerpt from an interview with Richard Pickens, Friends of the H.L. Mencken House by Eli Pousson, Baltimore Heritage on March 16, 2012.

Description of the H.L. Mencken House

Excerpt from an interview with Richard Pickens, Friends of the H.L. Mencken House by Eli Pousson, Baltimore Heritage on March 16, 2012.

Photos Show

H.L. Mencken, 1947

Photograph of H.L. Mencken at 1527 Hollins Street by A. Aubrey Bodine, November 25, 1947.

Image courtesy the Maryland Historical Society, Baltimore City Life Museum Collection, B737(4)B.

H.L. Mencken in his garden, 1955

Photograph of H.L. Mencken in his garden by A. Aubrey Bodine, July 28, 1955.

Image courtesy the Maryland Historical Society, Baltimore City Life Museum Collection, B737(5)D.

H.L. Mencken, 1955

Photograph of H.L. Mencken by A. Aubrey Bodine, July 28, 1955.

Image courtesy the Maryland Historical Society, Baltimore City Life Museum Collection, B737(5)H.

Cite this Page

“H.L. Mencken House,” Explore Baltimore Heritage, accessed August 22, 2014, http:/​/​explore.​baltimoreheritage.​org/​items/​show/​12.​
View a random Story
comments powered by Disqus

Share this Page