Confederate Soldiers and Sailors Monument

This sculpture is depicts Glory, an allegorical figure that looks in this sculpture like an angel, holding up a dying Confederate soldier in one arm while raising the laurel crown of Victory in the other. The dying soldier holds a battle flag. Underneath, the inscription states “Gloria Victis,” meaning “Glory to the Vanquished.”

The Maryland Chapter of the Daughters of the Confederacy funded the construction of this monument. It was sculpted by F. Wellington Ruckstuhl (also spelled Ruckstull), a French-born sculptor based in New York. It is located in a wide median on Mount Royal Avenue near Mosher Street in Bolton Hill.

The inscriptions on the monument are the following:
(Inscription on front of base:) GLORIA VICTIS/TO THE/SOLDIERS AND SAILORS/OF MARYLAND/IN THE SERVICE OF THE/CONFEDERATE STATES/OF AMERICA/1861-1865. (On base, right side:) DEO VINDICE
(On base, left side:) FATTI MASCHII/PAROLE FEMINE
(On base, back side:) GLORY/STANDS BESIDE/OUR GRIEF/ERECTED BY/THE MARYLAND DAUGHTERS/OF THE/CONFEDERACY/FEBRUARY 1903

The Latin phrase on the base is "Deo Vindice, " meaning "Under God, Our Vindicator." The Italian phrase on the base, "Fatti Maschii, Parole Femine" is Maryland's state motto, "Strong deeds and gentle words," although the direct translation is "Manly deeds, womanly words."

This monument bears a striking resemblance to two of Ruckstuhl's other sculptures - one Union, one Confederate. The Union Soldiers and Sailors Monument (1896) in Major Mark Park in Queens, New York, features the solitary Glory holding the laurel crown. The Confederate Monument (1903) in Salisbury, North Carolina is almost an exact replica of Baltimore's Confederate Soldier's and Sailors Monument, except that the dying soldier is holding a gun instead of a flag.

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W. Mount Royal Avenue, Baltimore, MD 21217