Penn Station

Description

Penn Station is a unique combination of a classic Beaux-Arts architectural design from architect Kenneth Mackenzie Murchison and a functional, adaptable train station that serves more than 855,000 guests a year as the eighth busiest station in the United States. Originally known as the Union Station, named for the Union of northern and southern railroads that came together at the station, this 1911 ornate granite, terra cotta, and cast iron building is the third structure to exist on the site.

In 1873, the Northern Central Railway building built the first station, a wooden structure, replaced in 1886 with a hulking Victorian brick structure. After critics declared the station to be overcrowded, uncomfortable, dangerous, and unsuitable for Baltimore's booming passenger traffic, the station was torn down in 1910 to be replaced by a new modern station. The architect, Kenneth Mackenzie Murchison, had extensive experience creating railroad stations around the nation and brought a stylish Beaux-Arts style to the job. Murchison's design incorporated an innovative waiting area illuminated by three large domed skylights directly connected to the boarding platforms.

The Pennsylvania Railway Company took over the station in the 1920s and renamed it Pennsylvania Station to match the other Penn Stations along the line. The building deteriorated over the years and during World War II blackout paint was applied to the skylight and windows. This remained through the early 1980s, when a $5 million facelift restored the mosaic flooring, glazed wall tile, marble detailing, and the windows.

Photos Show

Union Station, ca 1911

Photograph of Pennsylvania Station showing Charles Street and the Jones Falls published by the Detroit Publishing Company, between 1911 and 1920.

Image courtesy the Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division, LC-D4-73431.

Mt. Royal Avenue, 1930

Terraced gardens on Mt. Royal Avenue with Penn Station and the United States Parcel Post Station in the background. Photograph by James W. Foster, October 1930.

Image courtesy the Enoch Pratt Free Library, Maryland's State Library Resource Center, mdaa122. All Rights reserved. Used with permission. Unauthorized reproduction or use prohibited.

Penn Station Interior, 1983

In preparation for Penn Station's 1983 rededication, window washers clean the recently restored lobby windows. Photograph by John Davis, Baltimore News American, September 14, 1983.

Image courtesy the Enoch Pratt Free Library, Maryland's State Library Resource Center, mdaa191. All Rights reserved. Used with permission. Unauthorized reproduction or use prohibited.

Penn Station Restaurant, 1939

Photograph of a seafood restaurant at the northwest corner of Penn Station, November 27, 1939.

Image courtesy the BG&E Collection, Baltimore Museum of Industry, BGE.12818.

Charles Street, 1939

Photograph of Charles Street looking south from Penn Station, March 7, 1939.

Image courtesy the BG&E Collection, Baltimore Museum of Industry, BGE.1708N.

Penn Station, 1929

Photograph of Penn Station, April 9, 1929.

Image courtesy the BG&E Collection, Baltimore Museum of Industry, BGE.1825N.

Charles Street Bridge, 1910

Photograph of the Charles Street Bridge at Union Station, now known as Penn Station, ca1910-1911.

Image courtesy the Enoch Pratt Free Library, Maryland’s State Library Resource Center, mdaa229. All Rights reserved. Used with permission. Unauthorized reproduction or use prohibited.

Subjects

Cite this Page

“Penn Station,” Explore Baltimore Heritage, accessed September 1, 2014, http:/​/​explore.​baltimoreheritage.​org/​items/​show/​65.​
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