Recent Stories

When John H. Murphy, Sr. purchased the Afro-American Newspaper in 1897, the idea of sending a poet to cover a civil war in Spain was probably far from his mind, especially a poet as distinguished as Langston Hughes. His paper, after all, had a…

In almost every kitchen in Baltimore, and maybe Maryland, there is a tiny yellow, blue, and red tin of Old Bay seasoning. It is an essential part of local cuisine. Yet, most people are unaware of the spice’s dramatic Jewish history. Old Bay was…

Augusta T. Chissell was one of the most influential activists in the women’s suffrage movement in Maryland. She lived in the red painted row house at the corner of Druid Hill Ave and McMechen St. Through her tireless participation in important civil…

Austin Woolfolk was one of the first major slave traders in Baltimore, beginning as a 19-year-old in 1816. He was instrumental in turning the trade into a business. Like most traders at that time, he started with informal transactions in taverns and…

Before trading under his own name, Jonathan Means Wilson was associated with a few other slave traders. During the early 1840s, he worked as an agent for Hope Slatter, then switched to Joseph Donovan in the later 1840s. By 1849, he started his own…

A slave jail, located at 224 W. Pratt Street, was completed in 1838 by Hope Hall Slatter at the rear of his mansion. In addition to housing people to be sold from its auction block, the jail was a kind of rooming house with bars on the windows.…

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Explore Baltimore Heritage helps historians, students, and residents tell the stories behind Baltimore's buildings and neighborhoods. Read on to learn more about historic parks, theaters, rowhouses and more! Do you have an idea for a story? An old photograph you'd like to share? Please get in touch.

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