Historic Sites of Industry in the Jones Falls Valley

The Jones Falls provided the power that fueled manufacturing in Baltimore in the 19th and 20th centuries. The string of mills built in the valley along the river had an indelible economic and social impact on the surrounding areas, the effect of which can still be felt to this day.

Mount Washington Mill

Mt. Washington Mill—historically Washington Mill, part of Washington Cotton Manufacturing Company—is one of Maryland’s earliest purpose-built cotton mills. In the early nineteenth century, the Napoleonic Wars and the Embargo Act disrupted imports and…

Woodberry Factory and Park Mill

John Payne, in his comprehensive 1798 tome, A New and Complete System of Universal Geography, noted the flouring mills along the Jones Falls near Baltimore. At the time, wealthy abolitionist Elisha Tyson owned two of the ten documented mills: one at…

Poole & Hunt Foundry and Machine Works

In the early 1800s William E. Hooper started a flour mill at the current site of Clipper Mill . Converted to produce cotton cloth in the 1830s, the complex expanded into several new buildings along the Jones Falls. In 1843, Robert Poole opened a…

Meadow Mill

Baltimore industrialist William E. Hooper built Meadow Mill in 1877 during one of the most prosperous periods for industry in the Jones Falls Valley. Designed by architect Reuben Gladfelter, the structure represents the finest of Baltimore mill…

Hampden Branch, Enoch Pratt Free Library

The doors at Branch No. 7 of the Enoch Pratt Free Library opened to patrons on July 2, 1900, seventeen years after industrialist Robert Poole and fellow businessmen established Woodberry’s first community library. In 1899, Poole donated land across…

Whitehall Cotton Mill

Before the rise of textile mills, the fast-flowing water of the Jones Falls instead powered gristmills supplying Baltimore's lucrative flour trade. Whitehall Mill was established as a gristmill in the late 1700s and owned by James Ellicott, a member…

Mount Vernon Mill No. 1

In the nineteenth century, Baltimore was the world's leading supplier of cotton duck, a material that was used in items from uniforms and tents to sailcloth and parachutes. Much of it was made at a sprawling complex of mill buildings…

Mill Centre

Mount Vernon Mill No. 3 was once part of the network of mills owned by the Mount Vernon Mill Company. The village of Stone Hill, adjacent to Mill No. 3, was built around 1845 to house the growing workforce. Families housed in the cottage-like stone…
This tour was developed as a partnership between the Greater Hampden Heritage Alliance & Preservation Maryland for the Six-to-Fix— Preservation Maryland’s proactive preservation program. This tour was supported in part by the Baltimore National Heritage Area, Baltimore Architecture Foundation, and Preservation Maryland. Research and writing by Nathan Dennies and Kyle Fisher. Special thanks to Meagan Baco.